Dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

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A tree's growth rate changes in a predictable pattern throughout the year in response to seasonal climate changes, resulting in visible growth rings.

Each ring marks a complete cycle of seasons, or one year, in the tree's life.

During the latter half of the nineteenth century, the scientific study of tree rings and the application of dendrochronology began.The techniques of dendrochronology are more consistent in areas where trees grew in marginal conditions such as aridity or semi-aridity where the ring growth is more sensitive to the environment, rather than in humid areas where tree-ring growth is more uniform (complacent).In addition, some genera of trees are more suitable than others for this type of analysis.Dendrochronology (or tree-ring dating) is the scientific method of dating tree rings (also called growth rings) to the exact year they were formed in order to analyze atmospheric conditions during different periods in history.Dendrochronology is useful for determining the timing of events and rates of change in the environment (most prominently climate) and also in works of art and architecture, such as old panel paintings on wood, buildings, etc.A new layer of wood is added in each growing season, thickening the stem, existing branches and roots, to form a growth ring.

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