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It was really the growth of grain, wheat and maize that led Governor Macquarie to lay out, among others, the town of Windsor, in order to preserve the produce being lost by inundations after it had been harvested. This petition was signed by one hundred and fifty-six persons, among whom were Messrs. Arndell, Thomas Hobby, Andrew Thompson, George Crossley, John Dight, C. His son-in-law, Captain Putland, also had land adjoining. Methodist Church, formerly known as the Wesley an Church, has a very long and interesting history in Windsor.

We find, therefore, that several large granaries were built at the Green Hills, at first constructed of logs, and afterwards brick buildings of two and three stories. Captain Putland died in 1808, and was buried first in old St. The first Wesleyan class-meeting was held in 1812, when six members were enrolled, and the number soon increased to nineteen. Carvosso arrived in New South Wales in 1820, and was settled at Windsor the same year. The Wesleyan Church took a keen interest in missionary affairs, especially from 1820 to 1830, and some large missionary meetings were held.

"The Governor has accordingly marked out five separate townships, namely, one for the district of Green Hills, which he has called Windsor; one for Richmond Hill District, to be called Richmond; one for the Nelson District, to be called Pitt Town; one for Phillip District, to be called Wilberforce; and one for the Nepean or Evan District, to be called Castlereagh. The seasons at the period we write of were drier than formerly, the only floods of any consequence being in 16, until the late fifties, when floods again became frequent. Six acres of land enclosed, partly with a brick wall. About this time another prisoner was sentenced to seventy-five lashes for stealing a few oranges at Belmont. West watched the pulse while the flogging was publicly administered. Redfern, the assistant surgeon, and the officers of the 73rd Regiment.

Directions are already given to the several constables within those districts immediately to ascertain and make a return of the names of all those settlers whose farms are subject to be flooded, together with the number of their farms and number of their flocks and herds. About this period lived Margaret Catchpole, a somewhat mysterious character, who was buried in St. For her history we would refer our readers to numerous articles in the local papers, especially during the years 1889, 1893, 18. Horse racing was carried on in the year 1832, the racecourse being located at Killarney, of which John Howe was secretary. This proceeding was greatly resented by the more aristocratic members of the community. One-half of his estate was bequeathed to Governor Macquarie and Simeon Lord in equal parts, the remainder being left to his relatives in Britain.

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Governor Phillip when he explored the Hawkesbury in 1789 was moved to designate it "so noble a river", and, in the years to come, his successors had reason to endorse this opinion, for the banks of the river were the granary of the infant settlement. Phillip and Captains Collins, Johnston, Watkin, and Tench. A special train was run from Sydney, and one thousand spectators were present. From otter sources we learn that these vessels were built on the Hawkesbury. So rapid was the church's growth that it was decided to build a larger church, the foundation stone being laid on 17th October, 1838, by the Rev. Schofield, and the church, measuring fifty by thirty feet, capable of seating one hundred and fifty people, and costing one thousand and twenty pounds, was opened on 4th December, 1839, during the pastorate of Rev. This hall was built to accommodate the Wesleyan day-school. The church, which measures fifty-two feet by thirty-two feet, and cost two thousand and eighty pounds, was opened on 30th August, 1876, when a collection of four hundred pounds was taken, leaving a debt of six hundred and forty pounds on the building, which had been reduced to one hundred and sixty-four pounds in the year 1882, and has long since been cleared off. The main streets in Windsor proper were laid out and named. All these and other appointments and improvements were made in the years 1810-12, and from this date Windsor grew in importance and wealth as the chief inland town in the colony. The Evening News, in August and October, 1897, had a series of articles on Margaret Catchpole. This wharf was on the same spot, close to the present bridge, as that still used. Gentlemen, Graziers and the public generally are respectfully informed that the Windsor Fair will be held at the Market Place, Windsor, on Tuesday, 10th June, 1834, being the second Tuesday in the month of June, and that no charge is made by way of fee or toll for stock or articles offered for sale at the said Fair. About 1836, Glebe Street, afterwards known as Tebbutt Street, was surveyed off the Church Green and the allotments facing the Green sold. His death was specially notified to the Secretary of State, by Governor Macquarie, on 27th October, 1810. "In retracing the last twenty years of the life of this exemplary and much lamented character, it will not be held uncharitable to glance at the lapse from rectitude, which in an early and inexperienced period of youth destined him to these shores, since it will stamp a more honourable tribute to his memory to have it recorded, that from his first arrival in this country he uniformly conducted himself with that strict regard to integrity and morality as to obtain and enjoy the countenance and protection of several succeeding Governors. Matthew's church-yard reads as follows:— SACRED Justice of the Peace and Chief Magistrate of the District of the Hawkesbury, a Native of Scotland, who at the age of 17 Years was sent to this Country where from the time of his arrival he distinguished himself by the most persevering industry and diligent attention to the commands of his Superiors. As late as the year 1858 Windsor was considered the fourth town in the colony. William Walker in that year gave the following list of populations: Parramatta 15,758, Maitland 15,290, Bathurst 12,005, Windsor 8,431, Goulburn 7,028. In the year 1820, a party of explorers left Windsor to examine the Hunter River district. The party returned via the present site of Maitland, and several of the old Windsor residents became pioneers of that northern district. Fifteen hundred pounds was paid for it to Thompson's trustees in 1812. John Howe, Clerk of Market, pro tem." In 1831, the following were the Windsor contractors for the supply of stores, firewood, and cartage for the local Government survey parties:—Jas. The Roman Catholic Church got their grant from this in 1837. In his will he named as executors, John Howe, Simeon Lord (he was the father of the late George W. Active, intelligent, and industrious of manners, mild and conciliatory, with a heart generous and humane, Mr. By these means he raised himself to a state of respectability and affluence which enabled him to indulge the generosity of his nature In assisting his fellow Creatures in distress more particularly in the Calamitous Floods of the river Hawkesbury in the Years 18, and [when] at the immediate risque of his life and perminant injury of his health he exerted himself each time during three successive Days and Nights in saving the lives and Properties of numbers who but for him must have Perished. Thompsons good Conduct, Governor Macquarie appointed him Justice of the Peace. Amongst the leading laymen in the church in the past years, we find:—Mr. The hospital has been remodelled, but the old main walls remain. A painting of Governor Macquarie was arranged for by the inhabitants of Windsor during his last visit to the town, and this was executed on his return to England, at a cost of £73 10s., and has hung in the Court House for the past ninety years. Barracks for one hundred convicts, with high brick wall. The high brick wall was lowered many years ago, and the barracks are those still seen in Bridge-Street. The original gaol was, we believe, built before Macquarie's time, but he had it enlarged about the year 1820. The land was sold by Laban White, on 5th July, 1838. "During the unfortunate disturbances (the arrest of Governor Bligh) which lately distracted this colony, he, whose death we now lament, held on the 'even tenor of his way,' and acquitted himself with mildness, moderation, and wisdom, and when the ruthless hand of death arrested his earthly career, he yielded with becoming fortitude, and left this world for a better, with humble and devout resignation, and an exemplary confidence in the mercies of his God." The following account of the funeral appeared in the Sydney Gazette, 3rd November, 1810:—In the mention of the death of A. John Macarthur, referring to his death, says: "It was an interposition of Providence to save the colony from utter ruin; never was there a more artful or a greater knave." In Bigge's report on the colony of New South Wales, made in 1822, he describes him as using his wealth so as to gain an influence with the small settlers on the Hawkesbury, and also as a man of loose moral character. Governor Macquarie's reply, granting the citizens' request, is dated from Government House, Windsor, 4th January, 1822. The Cope family lived in the old cottage next the Presbyterian Church; the name appears in the Post Office Directory at 1835. Thompson, Esq., in the Gazette of last week, we should have added an account of the funeral, which took place on Friday Se'nnight (which means seven night), had we in time received it. Cartwright walked foremost, and was followed by Surgeons Mileham and Redfern, who had attended the deceased through the long and painful illness that brought to a conclusion an existence that had been well applied, Next followed the bier, attended by Captain Antill, A. But every fair-minded historian will see that a man who won the esteem of three successive Governors, as well as of all the leading residents of the district in which he lived, including the clergymen, and at whose funeral the whole district followed "their friend and patron" must agree that to call Andrew Thompson a bad citizen is a distortion of plain facts. Richard Fitzgerald arrived in the colony in the ship William and Ann, on the 28th August, 1791, when about nineteen years old. A fresh impetus was given to the church by the settlement of the Rev. Baker afterwards kept an hotel in Baker Street, known as the Royal Oak. On account of distress caused by floods the Governor curtailed the sale of rum during the year 1798. He next appears on the scene as a brewer, receiving permission on 11th May, 1806, to sell at a shilling a gallon, and small beer sixpence.

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